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\n<\/p><\/div>"}. Phone lines get congested in disaster. There are many places in the United States, called “fault zones,” that are at risk for serious earthquakes. Each time you feel an aftershock, practice duck, cover, and hold on techniques. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 584,631 times. Many people are not educated about the risks of earthquakes. They might fall during an earthquake and the less distance they have to fall, the better. My family and I, on the other hand, thanks to having the inquisitive sense to have checked out this site beforehand and learned some things, were able to put what we have learned into action. 10. Drop, Cover & hold until the shaking stops There are four basic steps you can take to be more prepared for an earthquake: Step 1: Secure your space by identifying hazards and securing moveable items. Have earthquake drills. Check off the items that you have completed in this list. Cover your mouth with a handkerchief or clothing. Form your plan together and go over it on a regular basis. Be Ready! Get safely on the ground, and find a safe item, such as a sturdy table, to use as protective cover. Prepare for, respond to, and recover from earthquakes, tsunamis, heat waves, and other disasters in our free workshops. Use Velcro®-type fastenings to secure some items to their shelves. Check with your local utility companies for instructions. NEVER leave the house in an earthquake, under any circumstances. Identify potential hazards in each room, including windows and other glass items, unanchored bookcases, furniture that can topple, items on shelves, and areas that could be blocked by falling debris. Have flexible fittings placed on your gas pipes. A safe spot may be underneath a sturdy table away from walls or underneath your covers with a pillow over your head if you are already in bed. • … Create a Disaster Preparedness Plan for your house or place of work. What do I do if I get stuck in a building during an earthquake? Pick safe places in each room of your home, workplace and/or school. Do any repairs if needed. Place an eye screw in the wall, and tie the thread around the object (such as a vase) and then tie it to the eye screw. The strength of earthquake can be measured by use of the richter scale. Shout only as a last resort. A professional plumber will need to do this. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. "Just got hit by a 5.3. Locate where the utility switches or valves are located so that they can be turned off, if possible. Teach everybody in the family (if they are old enough) how to turn off the water and electricity. !function(a){var e="https://s.go-mpulse.net/boomerang/",t="addEventListener";if("False"=="True")a.BOOMR_config=a.BOOMR_config||{},a.BOOMR_config.PageParams=a.BOOMR_config.PageParams||{},a.BOOMR_config.PageParams.pci=!0,e="https://s2.go-mpulse.net/boomerang/";if(window.BOOMR_API_key="Z5DRH-SSKMH-6DEVX-25BM9-PKGNP",function(){function n(e){a.BOOMR_onload=e&&e.timeStamp||(new Date).getTime()}if(!a.BOOMR||!a.BOOMR.version&&!a.BOOMR.snippetExecuted){a.BOOMR=a.BOOMR||{},a.BOOMR.snippetExecuted=!0;var i,_,o,r=document.createElement("iframe");if(a[t])a[t]("load",n,!1);else if(a.attachEvent)a.attachEvent("onload",n);r.src="javascript:void(0)",r.title="",r.role="presentation",(r.frameElement||r).style.cssText="width:0;height:0;border:0;display:none;",o=document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0],o.parentNode.insertBefore(r,o);try{_=r.contentWindow.document}catch(O){i=document.domain,r.src="javascript:var d=document.open();d.domain='"+i+"';void(0);",_=r.contentWindow.document}_.open()._l=function(){var a=this.createElement("script");if(i)this.domain=i;a.id="boomr-if-as",a.src=e+"Z5DRH-SSKMH-6DEVX-25BM9-PKGNP",BOOMR_lstart=(new Date).getTime(),this.body.appendChild(a)},_.write("'),_.close()}}(),"".length>0)if(a&&"performance"in a&&a.performance&&"function"==typeof a.performance.setResourceTimingBufferSize)a.performance.setResourceTimingBufferSize();!function(){if(BOOMR=a.BOOMR||{},BOOMR.plugins=BOOMR.plugins||{},!BOOMR.plugins.AK){var e=""=="true"?1:0,t="",n="ibxw5eyxy4dtqx7zb2fq-f-7b9996978-clientnsv4-s.akamaihd.net",i={"ak.v":"29","ak.cp":"25642","ak.ai":parseInt("272761",10),"ak.ol":"0","ak.cr":69,"ak.ipv":4,"ak.proto":"http/1.1","ak.rid":"6f6c7ff","ak.r":36139,"ak.a2":e,"ak.m":"","ak.n":"essl","ak.bpcip":"64.111.110.0","ak.cport":55781,"ak.gh":"23.55.63.180","ak.quicv":"","ak.tlsv":"tls1.3","ak.0rtt":"","ak.csrc":"-","ak.acc":"reno","ak.t":"1610157707","ak.ak":"hOBiQwZUYzCg5VSAfCLimQ==sTogAWF4ErbwyI1hrirZi8z05ycoISxBoH275OG0dC16lXB18NMxOTY2Fl66A2fYS4ctfdEzl1PtPgudOckQELrNzocEQlt0X2TTC0bDbrAdwKMDX/GNm5tveIRdZ+oR5KXS5GzfZnOm8fcGnmEL+rqS3J4lBqTTw9f9j04AKGtocNQrH13DQPFQI8hdSwMaVnR7FCPdUFbI32UKb7r7hTfTrTEjkTCNhrKY0xNmXPabJpPCUBiJnuzLY7FxOQFAVWEaZZEAbWFyVi6JRCETb1JOHBLLWHbiFDMJoUoF8P4ZtP285/VilcP8SGjX45ljaldJqPXmf+aL1QXSX6Vg8J1+FUqpAciJh4zRIAZMzdJ/39hTF4AWsCw/VxoNAmEmeFVaakelB82XmLHjmOq2OSkaJdfxyHU/PI3VDen9ewk=","ak.pv":"106","ak.dpoabenc":""};if(""!==t)i["ak.ruds"]=t;var _={i:!1,av:function(e){var t="http.initiator";if(e&&(!e[t]||"spa_hard"===e[t]))i["ak.feo"]=void 0!==a.aFeoApplied?1:0,BOOMR.addVar(i)},rv:function(){var a=["ak.bpcip","ak.cport","ak.cr","ak.csrc","ak.gh","ak.ipv","ak.m","ak.n","ak.ol","ak.proto","ak.quicv","ak.tlsv","ak.0rtt","ak.r","ak.acc","ak.t"];BOOMR.removeVar(a)}};BOOMR.plugins.AK={akVars:i,akDNSPreFetchDomain:n,init:function(){if(!_.i){var a=BOOMR.subscribe;a("before_beacon",_.av,null,null),a("onbeacon",_.rv,null,null),_.i=!0}return this},is_complete:function(){return!0}}}}()}(window); Know how the COVID-19 pandemic can affect disaster preparedness and recovery, and what you can do to keep yourself and others safe. Before an earthquake. As we know, an earthquake can and does happen anywhere, at any time. Did you feel it?  Wait until the tremors are done. Unlike other natural disasters like tornadoes and hurricanes that can be predicted by meteorologists, earthquakes cannot be predicted. Amid the current public health and economic crises, when the world is shifting dramatically and we are all learning and adapting to changes in daily life, people need wikiHow more than ever. Geplaatst op: 29 januari 2018. An earthquake is a sudden shake due to the movement of tectonic plates. How to Prepare for an Earthquake: A Guide + Checklist Earthquakes are some of the most unpredictable natural disasters. Restore your daily life by repairing damage and reconnecting with others. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. By using our site, you agree to our. Prepare for an earthquake. If you cannot attend a class, purchase basic first aid books and put them with each stash of emergency supplies in the house. Earthquakes can be scary for everyone. Personal and family emergency preparedness Get all of the help and advice you need to survive a major earthquake or other disaster in Vancouver. This procedure will force you not to run and affords you time to get your plan of action together for the moment the earth stops shaking. The angles can be bolted to the wall, and to ceiling joists or rafters if you have cladding on the house. Identify an out-of-area contact person, like an out-of-state aunt or uncle, that your family can call and get in touch with one another. Repair loose tiles or bricks, as needed. You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link. Approved. Your support helps wikiHow to create more in-depth illustrated articles and videos and to share our trusted brand of instructional content with millions of people all over the world. These are the most important things you need to know to survive a quake: % of people told us that this article helped them. Standard steel brackets are fine and easy to apply. How to prepare for an earthquake. Be prepared with an earthquake kit. Saving Lives, Protecting People, Natural Disasters, Severe Weather, and COVID-19, National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR), Natural Disasters and COVID-19: Preparedness Information for Specific Groups, COVID-19 Resources for Professionals & Emergency Workers, Reduce Exposure to Wildfire Smoke during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Generic Plans for COVID-19 Specimen Testing and Management During a Hurricane, Protecting Vulnerable Groups from Extreme Heat, Information for Professionals and Response Workers, Information for Organized Sporting Events, Epidemiologic Methods for Relief Operations, How to Help Loved Ones in Hurricane-Affected Areas, Resources for Emergency Health Professionals, Fact Sheet: Protection from Animal and Insect Hazards, Clinical Guidance for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning, CO Poisoning: Flyers and Educational Materials, Checklist for Reopening Healthcare Facilities, Prevent Illness and Injury After a Disaster, Immunization Recommendations for Individuals, Immunization Recommendations for Responders, Preventing Chain Saw Injuries During Tree Removal After a Disaster, Coping with a Disaster or Traumatic Event, Coping After a Natural Disaster: Resources for Teens, Finding a New Normal: Life After a Natural Disaster, Healthy Ways to Deal with Stress after a Natural Disaster, Helping Teens Cope After a Natural Disaster, Resources for State and Local Governments, Emergency Responders: Tips for taking care of yourself, Infection Control Guidance for Community Evacuation Centers, Respiratory Infections in Evacuation Centers, Medical Management and Patient Advisement, Human Trafficking in the Wake of a Disaster, Guidelines for a Diapering Station in Evacuation Centers, Interim Guidelines for Animal Health and Control of Disease Transmission in Pet Shelters, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. You should go to a local shelter if there is one. In this case, 81% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status. Do not panic during the earthquake. Step 3: By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. When tectonic plates, the huge pieces of the earth crust, rub together, pull apart, or crash against one another. If you are unable to wash your hands, use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. Stocked with first aid equipment, bottled water, food rations, gloves, face masks, insulation sheets, survival tools like torches, and even radios that broadcast regular updates. For example, fish bowls, vases, floral arrangements, statues, etc. Please consider making a contribution to wikiHow today. To learn how to create a Disaster Preparedness Plan to keep your family safe when an earthquake strikes, read on! Follow these steps to help your community prepare for an earthquake. Drop and cover your head from falling objects. They also consider their role in protecting themselves, their families, and members of their communities from harm during and after an earthquake. California is famous for major Use qualified, reputable plumbers and electricians for all electrical and plumbing work. Hang items such as pictures and mirrors away from beds and anywhere people sit. ", "Now I know what to do when this natural disaster occurs. Try to be at a safer place until the shaking stops. Prepare for an earthquake Drinking water and food: Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently and usually without warning. Avoid hanging pictures or mirrors near beds or places where people sit. You should try to hide under a table if at all possible. Assemble an emergency supply kit for your home. Make sure you and your children also understand the school’s emergency procedures for disasters. Whether you make your own kit or buy a professional kit, an earthquake survival kit will bring security during that time. Know what you and your family are going to do before the earthquake happens. During an earthquake, faulty fittings and wiring can become a potential fire hazard. Health and Safety Concerns for All Disasters, American Red Cross Earthquake Safetyexternal icon, FEMA’s Earthquake Safety Checklist pdf icon[PDF – 3.5 MB]external icon, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If at all possible, avoid living near fault lines and large mountains in an earthquake-prone region. This article has been viewed 584,631 times. If you are in bed, stay there, curl up and hold on, and cover your head. Emergency definitions explained. After an earthquake, you might not have access to water, food, electricity, or other necessities for up to a week. ", "I had a project to do on earthquakes, and this helped me out a lot. These supplies should include a first aid kit and emergency supply kits for the home and automobileexternal icon, including emergency water and food. As cities and states try to prepare for the Big One, seismologists and city officials also recommend being prepared at a personal level. Home: Make sure all family members know where the kit is kept. Similar items should be kept at your desk at work or school (for work, keep a pair of comfortable walking shoes ready). A lot of the earthquake survival steps are the same for other disaster types. For instance: If you are in a vehicle when an earthquake occurs, pull over and stop in a space clear of trees, buildings, bridges and power lines. Students engage in the science and engineering practices of analyzing data and obtaining information which leads them to ask investigatable questions about earthquakes. They occur without warning. Move heavy mirrors and pictures hanging above beds, chairs, and other places where you sit or sleep. Practice going to safe places away from glass and staying calm. Where is the best place to hide during an earthquake? By planning and practicing for evacuation, you will be better prepared to respond appropriately and efficiently to signs of danger or to directions by civil authorities. ! The most important thing is to protect yourself by performing "Drop, Cover and Hold On." Do not move around or kick up dust. How each household prepares for an earthquake varies; however, many homes are stocked with earthquake survival kits. Stay there until the shaking stops. Protect yourself from falling chimney bricks that might penetrate the roof, by reinforcing the ceiling immediately surrounding the chimney with 3/4-inch plywood nailed to ceiling joists. You should also make sure to place heavy or large objects on lower shelves. Survive when the earth shakes by performing Drop, Cover, and Hold On. What is an earthquake and how is the strength of an earthquake measured? Secure your large appliances (like refrigerators, water heaters, and stoves) with flexible cable, braided wire, or metal strapping. Teach all family members how and when to shut off utilities. During the aftermath of an earthquake, you could be stuck in one place without food or power for days. What should students do to prepare for an earthquake? What is the most important thing to do during an earthquake? You can also screw objects onto things, such as a desk. The key to surviving an earthquake and reducing your risk of injury lies in planning, preparing, and practicing what you and your loved ones will do if it happens.

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